12th Century Tablet Weaving: Inspiration and Creation

My favorite area of research is the late 12th / early 13th century in Western Europe, primarily France, Germany, and Italy.  I’ve got an incredible amount of close up photos and statuary for someone who’s not been lucky enough to visit those areas!

Just recently I stumbled on an incredible treasure, the Gospels of Henry the Lion.  Written sometime between 1175 – 1188 the book is INCREDIBLE (a few peeks are above!).  The pages are full of gorgeous full color illuminations and they’re simply breath taking.  I could rattle on for quite a while, but I’ll try to keep focused. If you’d like to check out more of the manuscript, it’s here:  http://diglib.hab.de/mss/105-noviss-2f/start.htm

I’ve had this stunning red orange overshot fabric set aside for a new bliaut, and this time I decided to weave trim for it.  As I have a small child, I wanted a more durable woven in pattern than an elaborate brocade, but still wanted to be true to the styles of the period.

Drawing upon the statues at Saint Loup de Naud (detailed photos below), I decided on a simple pattern using a mix of diamonds and diagonal lines.

Notes on color choice:  One thing many artists struggle with is creating images with up close and distant impact.  The single BEST tip I ever got was to take a photo of your planned colors in black and white.  If there’s clear contrast, your design will pop in color as well.

For this, I chose colors from the manuscript – a burgundy 2/20 silk from Eowyn De Wever and a light teal silk I dyed myself.   The pattern is 26 cards wide with a chocolate colored 2/20 silk border for contrast (personal aesthetic).

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I’ll use the trim along the neckline of the dress as well as the sleeves.

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